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Creatives Meet Business

Listen in on what industry experts had to say at the latest Creatives Meet Business event. Host Ashland Viscosi curates and shares the best content and tips from the live events to help creatives and artists transition into creative entrepreneurs.
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Creatives Meet Business
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Now displaying: 2017
Apr 18, 2017

Hi there folks!

Creatives Meet Business is an event and podcast series based out of Austin, Texas for creatives of ALL disciplines to get from zero to one in thinking of themselves as business owners (in the creative sector).

This episode features James Renovitch with The Austin Chronicle who joined us in December during our event on PR. As you'll soon find out, he succinctly explains PR from the journalist's perspective. He chats about everything from how you should speak to press to what you should share with them to maintaining your own personality (and much, MUCH more). Because there's so SO much that's exciting about this episode - let's hop in and hear what James has to say!

  • 0:00 to 2:42 - Ashland Opening Remarks and Intro of James Renovitch
  • 2:47 to 4:45 - Rule 1: Know That You're Emailing Another Human Being
    • Know who you're talking to! That extends to the publications (what their bread and butter is) and what each journalist covers
    • Know why you're writing to them. Tech related? About social issues?
  • 4:46 to 6:08 - Not Sure Who to Start With?
    • Call the front desk of the publication. Don't ask to be transferred, just describe your project and ask who you should be emailing
    • Still not sure? In your email outreach mention "I'm not sure if you're  the right person to share this with. If you're not, could you please direct me to the right person or forward my email to them?"
  • 6:09 to 7:27 - How Many Times Should You Follow-Up
    • If there's no time sensitivity - Send first email, wait a week (include information again). If you don't hear again, that's probably it. You can try again in a few weeks, but that's really the max you should do.
    • If it's time sensitive, you can fast track it a little
    • Be mindful about phone calls
  • 7:28 to 9:27 - Tone
    • Professional or Informal? Depends on who you're writing to - know who you're writing to!
    • Don't hide your personality.
    • Professionalism is great, but that's really about including what needs to be included.
      • Don't forget to include a link to your website.
    • Put yourself in the journalist's shoes - what would they want?
      • Include a summary, photo, a link to see more
  • 9:28 to 11:10 - Don't Write the Story for the Journalist
    • Help them picture what the final product would look like
    • Include a photo, a video (if you have one), some snippet that stands out about what you've created
    • Know your strengths and weaknesses
      • If it's unfinished, mention the elements that aren't complete
  • 11:15 to 12:11 - Ashland Closing Remarks

If you like what you hear, share the podcast with your friends, rate and review. To stay in the loop - follow us on TwitterFacebook or subscribe to the newsletter.

We're moving over to Digital Marketing soon and have some pros that we can't wait to introduce you to. Stay tuned!

Thanks!

Ashland, Creatives Meet Business

Mar 30, 2017

Hi there folks!

Creatives Meet Business is an event and podcast series based out of Austin, Texas for creatives of ALL disciplines to get from zero to one in thinking of themselves as business owners (in the creative sector).

This episode features Kristen Chin with POM PR who joined us in December during our event on PR. As you'll soon find out, she succinctly explains SO much about "timing" in the world of PR. She chats about everything from the variety of different media outlets and when you should pitch them to what should be on your timeline and how  you should format it (and much, MUCH more). If timelines eluded you before this episode, you'll walk away with a spring in your step and a better understanding of all things PR. Because there's so SO much that's exciting about this episode - let's hop in and hear what Kristen has to say!

  • 0:00 to 1:40 - Ashland Opening Remarks and Intro of Kristen Chin
  • 1:41 to 2:01 - Introduction of self and POM PR and topic "Timelines - Why They Matter and How to Plan One"
  • 2:02 to 2:47 - Newsworthiness
    • Ask yourself - "Is this your time and why?"
    • Think about what's your story and what's the timeframe for you
    • Editorial usually won't break more than two weeks before an event / performance. Look into paid marketing opportunities if you're wanting coverage beyond the two week mark.
  • 2:48 to 3:20 - Formatting Your Timeline and Tasks
    • Suggests using Excel or Google Calendars (create a PR calendar for your PR activities)
  • 3:21 to 4:09 - Tasks on your Timeline
    • Get your materials (press release, pitch, artwork, graphics) ready to go before you start pitching
      • Worst thing that can happen is you get press interested in your story and then don't have any images or materials and you lose the story altogether
  • 4:10 to 5:02 - Creating Your Media List
    • Research outlets and writers
    • Read recent stories the writers have written
    • Nothing will get your email deleted faster than sending something to a writer that's not relevant for them
    • Media move around a lot, make sure they're still with the publication you think they're with before you reach out (and make sure they're still writing on the same topic)
      • Check the website, masthead, LinkedIn, google
    • Beats can be very nuanced, researching helps you know you're reaching out to the right writer
  • 5:03 to 8:37 - Timeframes for long lead press
    • Magazines - 8 weeks out
      • Think of your end goal date and back that out 8 weeks
      • Tip - pull the media kit online and look at the advertising deadlines 
      • Editorial will always happen before the ad date close 
    • Calendar listings - 6 weeks out
      • All your basic information - who, what, where, when, pricing and an image
      • Many calendars are self-submitting. If it's the first time you're doing it, factor in timing for creating an account.
        • Check it after it's posted to make sure everything transferred properly, the image is correct, etc.
    • Online and blogs - pitch periodically
      • Bloggers might have content planned as much as two months out
      • Give yourself enough time
    • Coverage is in limited supply - think about when you were last featured
      • Coverage is spaced out
    • If your news isn't time sensitive, pitch it around when your topic best fits into the media's editorial calendar
      • Advertorial sections can give you a good indicator of the topic that's being featured in a publication
  • 8:38 to 11:11 - Press Releases
    • General news announcement for a vast number of outlets all at once
    • Cuts down on amount of time you need to spend on finding media contacts
    • You can use a wire service to reach a lot of press at once
    • Benefits to wire service is press release pickup that copies your press release word for word which helps with SEO and link backs to your site.
    • Downside to wire service - you have to monitor your coverage, you have no idea when your piece might hit.
    • Downside to press releases - you aren't cultivating relationships with press
    • Hybrid situation - you can build a media list yourself and then if time runs out, blast it out to your whole media list (use something like MailChimp or Constant Contact to see who opened it for follow-up).
      • You can also do this by separating your long leads from your short leads
      • You can also send to 5 or so people individually and then a press release to the remainder of the list
  • 11:12 to 11:59 - Frequency of Pitching
    • Pitch when you have something really important to say
    • Once you've pitched, you want to follow up once, wait a week and then follow-up again. Don't ever follow-up more than twice. If you haven't heard from someone after two follow-ups, they aren't interested (not the right topic or not the right time).
    • Don't get discouraged - it's all about patience
  • 12:03 to 12:58 - Ashland Closing Remarks
    • More PR to come!
    • Stay in touch, email us (ashland@cmbatx.com) or connect with us on social

If you like what you hear, share the podcast with your friends, rate and review. To stay in the loop - follow us on TwitterFacebook or subscribe to the newsletter.

We'll be sticking around the world of PR for a couple more weeks and have some pros that we can't wait to introduce you to. Stay tuned!

Thanks!

Ashland, Creatives Meet Business

Mar 7, 2017

Hi there folks!

Creatives Meet Business is an event and podcast series based out of Austin, Texas for creatives of ALL disciplines to get from zero to one in thinking of themselves as business owners (in the creative sector).

This episode features Casey Miller with lookthinkmake. She joined us in December during our event on PR. As you'll soon find out, she succinctly explains SO much about the world of PR. Topics range from media alerts to press releases to honing your story (aka - know, explain and stay true to your why) and much, MUCH more. If PR confused you before this episode, you'll walk away with a spring in your step and a better vocabulary for chatting about all things PR. Because there's so so much that's exciting about this episode - let's hop in and hear what Casey has to say!

  • 0:00 to 1:27 - Ashland Opening Remarks and Intro of Casey Miller
  • 1:32 to 1:40 - Introduction of discussion topic - honing your story and making it compelling
  • 1:41 to 2:26 - Back it up, begin with your why
    • Don't start with what you're doing, but WHY! Tie things into your brand pillars and identity. 
    • Have this serve as your anchor for everything you do
  • 2:27 to 3:25 - Think about who your audiences are and what they will find interesting
    • Who is your audience - you, clients, media, other people in your industry (all of them combined)
    • Start by writing down a list of topics about what is interesting about what you're doing 
  • 3:26 to 4:32 - Telling what you need to tell in a tight and meaningful way
    • Be digestible and surprising
    • Be mindful of what somebody is going to cling onto. People resonate with emotional aspects and anecdotes
    • When telling a story, think about building a friendship
    • Make sure you're building a relationship with your brand
  • 4:33 to 6:54 - Press Kit
    • Evergreen, but update it when you have new content
    • Introduction to your story and your brand
    • You write it yourself, it's a way to craft your own story
    • Be mindful of adjectives and words that work best for you
    • Press Kits contain: 
      • History
      • Why you're doing what you're doing (story)
      • Background
      • Bios
      • Facts
      • General Information
    • You want your press kit to be used by media and have quotes and content pulled from this, it's how you want to be described!
    • Include visual assets
      • Always a good investment, this content can be used in so many channels to tell your story
  • 6:55 to 8:55 - Press Releases
    • Owned content (you write this yourself) that you send out to announce a significant milestone or piece of news
    • Include a couple of quotes and a boiler plate at the bottom (company bio)
    • Helps strengthen SEO for website
    • Helpful to distribute over PRWeb or another news wire service because it helps get your name out there
    • Differentiate between fluffy pieces and more timely, significant milestones. Use a press release for the significant milestones, things like: a new partnership, hitting a major milestone, announcing a new brand, an award
  • 8:56 to 11:56 - Media Pitches
    • Opportunity to tell your story to someone to share it with their audience
    • Keep your email short, around 3 to 4 short paragraphs
    • Be mindful, people read emails on their phones and consider the amount of scrolling needed to read your email
    • Be clever, catchy and hook them with your first paragraph with what you're trying to accomplish
    • Be digestible and concise
    • Don't just say "I'd love you to cover this certain thing," offer a hook and differentiate how you can be helpful and a resource
    • Take the time and think about who you're writing to (know about this journalist)
      • Look at their coverage and see if you can match your story to what they like to write
    • Your subject line is also an opportunity to hook them (if they don't know you). You're asking them to take a lot of actions, but by hooking them the hurdles get smaller and smaller.
    • Use the same adjectives you use in your press kit
    • You don't have to be the only person in a story for it to be a successful story.
  • 11:57 to 12:48 - Don't forget your interviews!
    • Prepare! Be prepared for them! 
    • You want to give a sound bite conversationally
    • Do your research on the journalist
    • Media isn't the only way to tell your story
    • Don't forget to reach out all the time, stay top of mind and be consistent
      • Don't pop up once every 6 months, they won't remember who you are
    • Eventually you'll find a story that works, the point is to build a relationship with the journalist
  • 12:49 to 13:56 - Ashland Closing Remarks
    • More PR to come!
    • Stay in touch, email us (ashland@cmbatx.com) or connect with us on social

If you like what you hear, share the podcast with your friends, rate and review. To stay in the loop - follow us on TwitterFacebook or subscribe to the newsletter.

We'll be sticking around the world of PR for a few more weeks and have some pros that we can't wait to introduce you to. We're so excited about future episodes on: timelines, leveraging events as part of your PR strategy and much more. Stay tuned!

Thanks!

Ashland, Creatives Meet Business

Feb 8, 2017

Hi there folks!

Creatives Meet Business is an event and podcast series based out of Austin, Texas for creatives of ALL disciplines to get from zero to one in thinking of themselves as business owners (in the creative sector).

This episode features Jennifer Sinski with Giant Noise. She joined us in December during our event on PR. As you'll find out, she leaves no stone unturned when it comes to Influencer Marketing. Topics range from what an influencer is, what pay to play is, how to engage with an influencer from a brand perspective and much, MUCH more. If influencer marketing confused you before this episode, you'll walk away with a spring in your step and a better vocabulary for chatting about all things influencer. Because there's so so much that's exciting about this episode - let's hop in and hear what Jennifer has to say!

  • 0:00 to 1:26 - Ashland Opening Remarks and Intro of Jennifer Sinski
  • 1:28 to 1:48 - Introduction of self, Giant Noise and discussion topic
  • 1:56 to 2:38 - Defines Influencer
    • Owns own platform (blog, Facebook page, YouTube), not a traditional media outlet and produces their own content. Looked to as tastemaker / leader in their area
  • 2:39 to 4:47 - Interacting with influencers and Pay to Play
    • Influencers are willing to promote a service or product in exchange for an experience or product
    • Restaurant example - dining experience for Instagram post
    • Pay to Play - Influencer will provide a media kit as well as cost for a post
  • 4:48 to 8:19 - How to Identify Influencers
    • Depends on industry
      • Food - look up hashtags, what's being tagged and who is tagging them
      • Search through location or services 
        • Instagram blocks APIs of a lot of 3rd party apps 
      • Look at Follow Page
      • Content that your friends like, people around you are liking
      • Hashtag research
        • Top content being engaged with, that content creator is someone you might consider being on the influencer level
      • Having a second means of communication - a blog, YouTube or other platform is a plus
    • Micro influencer - anyone under 20K followers on Instagram (not exclusive to Instagram, there are other platforms that should be considered)
  • 8:20 to 8:54 - Negotiating with an Influencer
    • Be clear about your expectations and what you're getting
    • With Pay to Play - Have a Contract!
      • Include: how many times they'll post, the copy of the post, when it'll be posted by, how they'll get paid, have them send a W-9
      • Don't just have a one email interaction or send product blindly, it won't come back to you
  • 8:55 to 10:14 - Identifying Fake Followers
    • You can buy followers
      • 100,000 followers with 100 likes or zero comments aren't good odds that they have real followers
    • Services that comment on photos for you doesn't translate to event attendance or product purchases
      • Services let you select demographic and it'll make comments like "This is everything" or "Thumbs up" 
    • Follow / Unfollow - following a person in the hopes they follow you back, then unfollowing them
    • Understand how Influencers have built their audience. If you are wanting to work with them, will this audience help you do what you want them to do
  • 10:15 to 12:00 - Influencer PR Strategy
    • Goes hand in hand with a traditional PR strategy. Just like you would do a media alert or press release, you'd pitch an influencer but tailor it to them
    • Expectation isn't that they will write about it. In outreach, offer opportunities for photographing and more
    • Influencer outreach is same type of interaction as press outreach
    • Done on every level, not just locally
    • Mommy blogging is a big market
  • 12:01 to 12:58 - How People Become Influencers
    • Some buy followers, for others it just happens
    • How to deal with it? Honesty with audience is key!
      • Attend media events
      • Attend free events
      • Sponsored posts are an option
    • Influencer Marketing helps brands reach their target demographic directly
  • 12:59 to 13:17 - Who Works with Influencers?
    • Ad Agencies and PR firms are in the middle, both share in this space 
    • Some ad agencies have targeted themselves as only working with influencers
  • 13:18 to 14:31 - Ashland Closing Remarks

If you like what you hear, share the podcast with your friends, rate and review. To stay in the loop - follow us on TwitterFacebook or subscribe to the newsletter.

We'll be sticking around the world of PR for a few more weeks and have some pros that we can't wait to introduce you to. We're so excited about future episodes on: timelines, making sure your story is compelling for press, leveraging events as part of your PR strategy and much more. Stay tuned!

Thanks!

Ashland, Creatives Meet Business

Jan 17, 2017

Hi there folks!

Creatives Meet Business is an event and podcast series based out of Austin, Texas for creatives of ALL disciplines to get from zero to one in thinking of themselves as business owners (in the creative sector).

This episode features Jon Lebkowsky, founder and CEO of Polycot Associates. Jon is a fascinating fellow and is beyond knowledgable about all things web and development (and on ALL things internet).  Jon shares about the different types of platforms out there (and the difference between them) and what questions you should be thinking about if you're ready to work with a developer. Because there's so so much that's exciting about this episode - let's hop in and hear what Jon has to say!

  • 0:00 to 2:16 - Ashland Opening Remarks and Intro of Jon Lebkowsky
  • 2:20 to 5:23 - Four Categories of Platforms  
    1. Hosted Service - examples include Squarespace, Wix, Tumblr
    2. Light Content Management System - you arrange the hosting yourself. WordPress is an example. Note - WordPress does have a hosted version, but Jon is talking about the software, not the service.
    3. More Complex Content Management Frameworks. An example is Drupal
    4. Web Application Development Frameworks - Ruby on Rails is an example. Basecamp is an example of a site built with Ruby on Rails
      1. Rails is good for rapid prototyping and web application development
  • 5:24 to 7:11 - Web Development is less about building from scratch and more about re-tooling to increase and customize functionality. Two ways to extend functionality:
    1. Themes, free or purchase - configure to customize based on needs
    2. Additional functionality that's not in the core platform:
      1. WordPress - plug-ins
      2. Drupal - modules
        1. Be careful of the plug-ins or modules you attach to your site as they increase complexity to site and potential for conflicts. There could be security flaws with the plug-ins or modules, so be cautious.
  • 7:12 to 11:32 - Questions to Ask When Decided on a Platform
    • What are you trying to do and who are you trying to reach with the platform?
      • Brochure sites - basic information
      • Considered Purchase site - informative, repeat traffic from same visitor
      • Information site or portal - very information dense
      • E-commerce site - can be simple or complex
      • Web application - application that's served over the web (Basecamp is an example)
    • How are you going to choose a developer? If you have someone in mind, get to know their platform proficiency.
      • Recommended to get developer first and include them in the conversation about platform selection that will work for your project
    • How much can you afford to spend?
    • How much are you willing to spend for ongoing maintenance?
    • How often will your website and content change?
  • 11:36 to 12:36 - Content Management System For Self-Maintenance 
    • Open source allowed more freedom for customers to change  developers, no longer locked into a developer if the client was dissatisfied 
  • 12:37 to 13:57 - Ashland Closing Remarks

If you like what you hear, share the podcast with your friends, rate and review. To stay in the loop - follow us on TwitterFacebook or subscribe to the newsletter.

We'll be moving over to PR next, so start getting excited. Stay tuned for more!

Thanks!

Ashland, Creatives Meet Business

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